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Reasons for Not Maturing 2

Have you ever realized how the word childish is so undermined? and, have you ever seen how it seems that in adulthood the word “childish” is treated as a means to undervalue adults and their actions alike?

Sometimes, I feel like I can see people waiting for the right moment in order to point out how childish any adult is behaving in a certain context. They are like childish-like-behavior patrol, and it seems like this kind of behavior is very offensive for these people. Playing on the ground, touching, creating, solving, getting your hands full of dirt, and laughing in the meantime are activities that must be avoided by all means when in among adults.

I completely agree that there are situations, ceremonies, rituals and positions where a specific type of behavior is expected from any person. And it is the best practice because this behavior is a social contract accepted by everyone within their culture, hence the Pope is expected to perform in a specific way, the president is expected to address with such correctness that no one would behold otherwise, brides and grooms are expected to develop their love for each other in rituals only people in love may understand and so on. A teacher is expected to perform and conduct their duties in ways to favor children’s learning. Besides, teachers also have the duty to protect their students and keep them out of danger and because teachers are adults, students expect all that and maybe more from them, even though nobody has ever told anything about this to a child. However, none of these examples have anything to do with the “fact” that an adult must not be childish at all times.

Have you ever been a teacher in a kindergarten? -If you are a parent, it works too. I’m not one though- But I am the coordinator of many things in the school I work, and part of my duties is to oversee my peers, so I have to go to kindergarten classrooms many times and it must be mentioned that I absolutely love it. This is the best place to watch childish actions happening; it always amazes me how a child explores any little thing that appeals to her or him and the awe phase children always experience with that new little thing is what I cherish the most. Once I read that in order to continue learning throughout life is to never stop being in awe; to be amazed by new knowledge is what will make that new information remain stored in our heads, just like a child.

Another childish action that I love is the lack of fear of being wrong, a child will continue on doing or undoing until he or she gets what he or she wants, or the child may speak out his/her mind trying to answer the teacher’s inquiries no matter what. As people get older, people start to think before speaking and that is perfect; I do not like people participating with arguments not worth sharing. But what people must not forget is their capacity to being wrong, and that being wrong is not wrong at all, and that no matter what, people have to explore every possibility in order to be right. As teacher, I sometimes need to teach children that being wrong is right an that it is only an opportunity to learn a little bit more about that fact and about ourselves.

Because a child likes to explore, a child needs to move around and because I am childish I like to move too… a lot. A different responsibility of mine is to give a “lecture” from time to time, so I have to hand the books/copies/booklets out to the rest of the staff and to settle a date and time for the feedback. I always try to make the meetings interesting, motivating and not boring, as a result I move the participants around, change teams, find out more about the others and small activities that would make them to be in awe. Unfortunately, this does not appeal to some and they feel threatened and maybe even disgusted by the idea of moving because they already are “mature” teachers.

I embed an animation that I enjoyed tremendously and the first time I watched it I could not stop laughing. It is an excellent reminder of not getting mature. Enjoy.

 

The Chase from Philippe Gamer on Vimeo.